Consider Efficiency Ratings Before Scheduling A Furnace-Install

Posted by James Memije on Apr 9, 2015 1:29:00 PM
James Memije

furnace-installation-toronto

Deciding to replace a furnace isn't an easy decision, even when your current furnace no longer operates efficiently. For many people, pressing questions remain even once they've decided to invest in a new furnace install. They want to choose wisely, and not cut any corners

At AccuServ Heating and Air Conditioning, one of the most frequent questions that our customers ask is what to look for in a new furnace.

When choosing a furnace, you should consider cost, brand, consumer ratings, and the size of a new unit. In addition to these important considerations, it's important to find out the unit's energy efficiency over its lifespan.

Understanding Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE)

The AFUE is the standard way of measuring a furnace's energy efficiency. It can provide valuable information to a consumer who is reviewing furnaces. The AFUE measures and rates how well the furnace utilizes the amount of fuel available to it against how much fuel is vented outdoors, and thereby wasted. The AFUE is expressed as a whole percentage. For example, a new furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 percent uses all but five percent of its fuel to heat your home or business.

According to Natural Resources Canada, furnaces in the mid-efficiency range have a minimum AFUE rating of 78 percent. You get into high-efficiency territory starting at 88 percent AFUE, depending on the specific model you choose. While you may pay more for a furnace with a high rating, you should also consider the expected heating-cost savings over the next 15 to 20 years.

Need More Information?

The staff at AccuServ Heating and Air Conditioning are available from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. to answer any questions you have about furnace installation. You may also contact us by email or through our 24-hour scheduling line to request an appointment.

 

 

Topics: furnace install

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Consider Efficiency Ratings Before Scheduling A Furnace-Install

Posted by James Memije, Apr 9, 2015 1:29:00 PM

furnace-installation-toronto

Deciding to replace a furnace isn't an easy decision, even when your current furnace no longer operates efficiently. For many people, pressing questions remain even once they've decided to invest in a new furnace install. They want to choose wisely, and not cut any corners

At AccuServ Heating and Air Conditioning, one of the most frequent questions that our customers ask is what to look for in a new furnace.

When choosing a furnace, you should consider cost, brand, consumer ratings, and the size of a new unit. In addition to these important considerations, it's important to find out the unit's energy efficiency over its lifespan.

Understanding Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE)

The AFUE is the standard way of measuring a furnace's energy efficiency. It can provide valuable information to a consumer who is reviewing furnaces. The AFUE measures and rates how well the furnace utilizes the amount of fuel available to it against how much fuel is vented outdoors, and thereby wasted. The AFUE is expressed as a whole percentage. For example, a new furnace with an AFUE rating of 95 percent uses all but five percent of its fuel to heat your home or business.

According to Natural Resources Canada, furnaces in the mid-efficiency range have a minimum AFUE rating of 78 percent. You get into high-efficiency territory starting at 88 percent AFUE, depending on the specific model you choose. While you may pay more for a furnace with a high rating, you should also consider the expected heating-cost savings over the next 15 to 20 years.

Need More Information?

The staff at AccuServ Heating and Air Conditioning are available from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. to answer any questions you have about furnace installation. You may also contact us by email or through our 24-hour scheduling line to request an appointment.

 

 

James Memije

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James Memije

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